Wed. Oct 20th, 2021

I’ve met a lot of preppers who buy all kinds of survival gear on a regular basis but never create their own (you know who you are). There are a number of reasons why this is a major error, but let’s focus on two of them:

First and foremost, you are wasting money by purchasing items that are less expensive to create at home. Second, you might be obliged to manufacture your own food during a long-term disaster when grocery store shelves are all bare. So why not learn how to do it?

A list of 25 relatively simple survival items is provided below. Each one has a link to a tutorial that will guide you through the process.

Survival Items You Can Make At Home

Soap

Every prepper should be able to create their own soap. In a long-term disaster where sanitation is deteriorating, diseases are on the rise, and doctors are absent, hygiene will be even more crucial.

Deodorant

Deodorant, while not essential for survival, can improve your mood and humanity by keeping you smelling fresh.

Lotion

So that your skin doesn’t become irritated or cracked, you’ll want to keep it in good shape. Disasters are difficult enough as it is, so anything that may lessen the pain is worthwhile.

Antibiotic Cream for Wounds

In any survival circumstance, being able to correctly heal wounds is critical, and having an easy-to-make remedy on hand will save you from having to hunt for antibiotic ointment.

Poultice

When you have wounds or injuries, you’ll need something to relieve the pain and reduce inflammation, and the poultice is a herbal cure you can hunt for and locate in a variety of places.

Candles

Candles are a great source of light, heat, and bug repellent for those who don’t have access to electricity (or have restricted access to it).

Oil Lamp

An oil lamp is preferable to a candle because it produces more light and is less likely to be knocked over. A wick, a mason jar, and some olive oil are all you need.

Fuel

After the emergency, a sustainable life may require some form of fuel to operate motors and generators for transportation and power generation. Fortunately, there is a way to make your own ethanol at home.

Charcoal

You can keep grilling regardless of how long it takes for grocery stores to restock charcoal if you learn to make your own. It’s actually not as difficult as you may imagine; it simply takes some time.

Char Cloth

Prepare char cloth ahead of time to carry with you when you need to start a fire. Use a compact metal container, such as an Altoids tin, that can be snugly sealed. To allow smoke to escape, poke a small hole with a nail. If the hole is too large, oxygen will seep in and ignite your cloth.

Use a 100 percent cotton loosely woven material, rip it up, and stuff it inside. Place the tin over a bed of hot coals until it no longer smokes. Allow it to sit until the coals have dissipated. You’ll have your char cloth to carry in your BOB after you open it.

Fire Starter

In a survival situation, having a tried and proven fire starter might mean the difference between life and death. It will be much easier to light a fire if you have a decent fire starter.

Waterproof Matches

Waterproof matches are ideal for those spending time outside and building their own fires, as they may be used even in damp and freezing conditions.

Tin Can Stove

You may create your own penny can stove and store it in your BOB instead of spending your hard-earned money on a rocket stove or a beautiful Coleman camp stove.

You’ll need the following items to create a cent can stove:

  • Two cans of aluminium
  • To cut them, use scissors or tin snips.
  • Mark your cutting lines using a permanent marker or another method.
  • To make holes, use a nail or a punch.
  • Sealant made of silicon.
  • After the cans have been cut, use a file or sanding block to smooth the cut edges.
  • To mark your cans for cutting, you’ll need a thick flat surface and a narrow flat surface.
  • a single penny
  • Other fuel sources, such as denatured alcohol

A simple burner that uses a few candles to heat canned meals and warm beverages, as well as bake flatbread.

Rocket Stove

A rocket stove is simple to create and can help you bridge the gap between conventional kitchen cooking and roughing it over a campfire without any cooking tools for survival meals.

Solar Oven

You won’t have access to a stove in a survival situation, but you can improve your chances of survival by learning how to make your own solar cooker, which harnesses the sun’s energy to heat a chamber for cooking.

Water Filter

One of the most basic requirements for human living is the availability of potable water. In a survival crisis, knowing how to manufacture your own water filter can save your life.

Aquaponics Garden

Try balancing the ecosystems of a garden and an aquarium with an aquaponics garden for a more long-term sustainable food choice.

PVC Bow

Few DIY weapons are handier and easier to create than a bow strengthened with PVC for hunting small to large games and even for defense.

Traps

It’s nearly impossible to carry enough food in a 72 family bug-out pack to last for months at a time. Instead, bring a couple of homemade traps or the ingredients to create one with you.

Paracord Belt

You never know when you’ll be in a circumstance when a few feet of rope will be the difference between life and death. Wearing a paracord belt allows you to keep a long length of rope with you at all times.

Hard Tack

This basic snack requires only three ingredients (flour, salt, and water) and is extremely simple to prepare. It will also persist for many years.

Compass

A compass is an essential survival gear for anyone surviving in the woods, and it’s still a good idea for urban and suburban preppers to carry one as well.

Many disasters, it turns out, have the ability to radically reshape the landscape and obliterate regularly used landmarks, making navigating impossible.

Isn’t it true that if you don’t have a compass for this circumstance, you’re doomed? Not so fast: with just a fine, ferrous needle, a piece of cork, and a non-magnetic container or vessel that can hold water, you can quickly create a rudimentary, but effective enough compass:

All you have to do is magnetize the needle so that it interacts with the Earth’s magnetic field, just like any other compass.

It will undoubtedly rotate to point magnetic north if it is placed in the cork and then floats on the surface of the water.

Obviously, compared to a true compass, utilizing this for an accurate bearing is difficult, but it will send you in the right direction.

Butter

When the SHTF, having homemade butter on hand will come in handy for cooking, especially if you’re forced to cook outside without non-stick cookware.

Emergency Bread

This is a recipe for a filling flatbread that is simple to make. You may use it to make regular sandwiches or use it as a tortilla to make wraps, burritos, and whatever else you desire.

Zeer Pot

With a homemade Zeer pot, you can extend the life of your food and keep it fresh. Many rural areas in Africa and the Middle East have utilized Zeer pots to naturally chill food and keep it fresh for longer.

By Beth

I'm Beth Nunes, the proprietor of preparing in the city. My family is the most important thing in the world to me. I couldn't bear the thought of my three small children going hungry, so I became obsessed with finding simple and practical ways to be prepared for the future by building food storage and gathering other emergency preparedness items.

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